Long-Acting Contraceptive Designed to be Self-Administered Via Microneedle Patch

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Regents Professor Mark Prausnitz and postdoctoral research scholar Wei Li examine an experimental microneedle contraceptive skin patch. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

Regents Professor Mark Prausnitz holds an experimental microneedle contraceptive skin patch. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

Microscope image shows microneedles containing the contraceptive drug levonorgestrel. The microneedles are less than one millimeter tall. (Credit: Wei Li, Georgia Tech)

Image shows how an experimental microneedle contraceptive skin patch could be applied to the skin. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)

An experimental microneedle patch is shown next to a blister pack of birth control pills. Designed to be self-administered by women for long-acting contraception, the patch could provide a new family planning option. (Credit: Christopher Moore, Georgia Tech)